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VCD technology to be utilized in Toronto's landmark YC Condominiums
25 November 2015


Kinetica is pleased to announce that its ground-breaking Viscoelastic Coupling Damper (VCD) technology will be used in the landmark YC Condominiums in Toronto. The VCD technology will ensure the slender 66-storey residential tower is resilient to unwanted vibrations caused by high winds and earthquakes. The building, to be located at Yonge and College in Toronto, also brings the technology to a mere 10 minute walk from where it was developed at the University of Toronto's Department of Civil Engineering. Kinetica's VCD is manufactured by Nippon Steel & Sumikin Engineering and utilizes 3M Viscoelastic Material, the first ever damping technology used in tall buildings, which has now been re-engineered for hyper-efficient use in modern skyscrapers without occupying any architectural space. When used in the structural design, the resulting design is safer, more efficient and, in addition, towers can potentially be built taller than ever before. For YC Condominiums, 42 reinforced concrete beams on 21 levels will be replaced by Kinetica's VCDs in order to mitigate wind vibrations under frequent storms, a critical part of the structural design for Toronto-based engineers, Read Jones Christoffersen. It will also be the only known tall building in Toronto with an earthquake protection system. "The VCDs in YC Condos allowed us to provide the added damping to the building that was desired for the structural design and allowed us to maximize our sellable square footage", said Ben Rogowski, Executive Vice President of Canderel. "Canderel is a forward thinking developer and therefore we wanted to lead the industry in embracing this new development in high-rise building design". This local Toronto innovation also has worldwide reach. Kinetica recently signed a distribution agreement with Shanghai Lead Dynamic Engineering Inc. during the Ontario Premier's Trade mission in China in order to bring this technology to China, the worlds largest tall building market with a potential annual VCD market of over $50 million.
Kinetica is a Toronto-based engineering company changing the way tall buildings are built throughout the world. Kinetica's objectives are to improve the performance and resiliency of buildings and infrastructure through the use of advanced engineering technologies. Kinetica markets and provides technical support to engineers wanting to use the VCD technology. VCDs were developed over the past decade at the University of Toronto with industry-leading engineers and manufacturing partners Nippon Steel & Sumikin Engineering and 3M. Development of this technology has received numerous awards and garnered generous support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Ontario Centers of Excellence (OCE), MITACS, Heffernan Fellowship, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, Innovations and Partnerships Office and Impact Center at the University of Toronto.